Category Archives: Health Relevant Experience

Summer Health Professions Education Program (SHPEP) Webinar

Are you a college freshman or sophomore seeking a summer career-enrichment opportunity within the health professions?  Register today to join the upcoming Summer Health Professions Education Program (SHPEP) webinar and get an in-depth look into all the program has to offer.  The webinar will occur Thursday, January 26, 2017 @ 5 PM EST. Register today for the SHPEP webinar to learn the first-hand experience of past SHPEP scholars who successfully completed the 6-week summer career-enrichment experience! Webinar panelists will include SHPEP alumni and ambassadors who will discuss the academic possibilities they obtained, thanks to their educational experience at the SHPEP. The University of Iowa will also offer great tips and insight to potential applicants eager to apply.

Formerly SMDEP (Summer Medical and Dental Education Program), the program expanded in 2016 to include a broader range of health professions beyond medicine and dentistry to include pharmacy, nursing, optometry, public health, physical therapy and physician assistant.  Participation in the summer enrichment program may better position students for acceptance into advanced degree programs.  Students should visit www.shpep.org to learn more and apply to the SHPEP today.  The application deadline is March 1, 2017.

 

CLIMB UP for Summer Research

Dear Undergraduate Students:

We would like to invite you to apply to The CLIMB UP (Undergraduate Program) for Summer Research at the University at Buffalo  for Summer 2017. We would also encourage you to share this with your friends, professors, and colleagues. Please see below and attached.

What is CLIMB UP?

The CLIMB (Collaborative Learning and Integrated Mentoring in the Biosciences) Program at UB has created CLIMB UP for Summer Research, an outstanding summer research experience for undergraduate students to excel in biomedical, STEM, and health science research and explore career opportunities. Now entering its 9th summer, the overall goal is to introduce you to research opportunities, facilitate understanding of recent advances in the STEM disciplines, and mentor you towards graduate and professional careers. As a CLIMB UP Fellow, you will be guided through novel and exciting research projects and mentored by faculty, graduate students, and postdoctoral fellows through the summer and beyond. You will spend 10 weeks (May 30-August 4, 2017) in the laboratory of your research mentor, whom you will be paired with based on your interests. We will train you in various areas necessary to safely and efficiently perform your research and related activities.

What Areas of Research Does CLIMB UP Offer?

The CLIMB UP for Summer Research offers many diverse research opportunities in the STEM disciplines. Faculty are associated with a wide range of UB programs, encompassing virtually every aspect of scientific research.

Based on your interests and career goals, you can apply to work with mentors who fall under 3 categories:

Each of the links below contains detailed information on recent mentors in each group.

Undecided!?! No problem! On your application, please let us know which mentors and/or areas of science are most interesting to you, and upon acceptance, we will work with you to select the best mentor for you.

What’s on the Agenda?

As a CLIMB UP Fellow, you will:

  • Complete individualized lab rotations
  •  Learn and apply laboratory skills (1-week course)
  • Gain exposure to a wide variety of STEM disciplines
  • Discover graduate and professional school possibilities at UB
  • Present your research in a formal symposium setting
  • Enjoy all that Summer in Western New York offers
  • Build lasting relationships with mentors and fellow students

Who Is Eligible for CLIMB UP?

CLIMB UP trains highly qualified undergraduate students interested in scientific research. Students receive a living stipend through SURF, CLIMB PRO, or iSEED (and other sources if available), and housing is provided for students who live outside of Western New York. Students enrolled in the program are entering their sophomore, junior, or senior years in undergraduate programs in colleges and universities nationwide. We are often asked if students can be recent college graduates- and the answer is yes, but you should not be already enrolled in an advanced degree program. Students must be US citizens or permanent residents to be eligible for funding.

How Do I Apply?

Applications for Summer 2017 are due by February 1, 2017.

Applicants for The CLIMB UP for Summer Research are required to submit:

  1. ONLINE APPLICATION FORM (click here!)
  2. Personal statement describing interest in research and career goals (in online application, or you may also email this part to climb@buffalo.edu)
  3. Please forward a copy of your most recent CV or resume to climb@buffalo.edu.
  4. Two (2) letters of recommendation from people who know you well (professor, advisor, supervisor, etc) should be e-mailed directly to the program at climb@buffalo.edu. We strongly recommend that at least one of your letters be from someone who can comment specifically about your research experience. Please ask your referees to include in the subject line: your last name followed by a colon, and the words “CLIMB UP rec” (example, Smith:CLIMB UP rec)
  5. Please forward us a copy of your latest academic transcript, preferably by e-mail to climb@buffalo.eduunofficial copies are encouraged. Upon your acceptance into the program, we would request that you have your official transcript sent to us directly from your college or university.

If you have specific questions, please feel free to contact us!

For further information, please visit us online OR- “Like” CLIMB UP on Facebook! https://www.facebook.com/CLIMBUPatUB

Best wishes,

Margarita L. Dubocovich, PhD
Director of the The CLIMB Program

Liz Marshall
CLIMB UP Program Coordinator

Rajendram V. Rajnarayanan, PhD
Associate Director of the The CLIMB Program

Jackie Baum
iSEED Coordinator

 

Genome Day – Call for Volunteers

The third annual “Genome Day” will be held on March 9, 2017!  Volunteers are currently being recruited from UB students, faculty and staff for this event.

Logistical Details for volunteers:

  • 400 8th grade students from Buffalo Public Schools visit UB’s Center of Excellence and Roswell Park to learn about DNA, genetics, careers, and extract their own DNA from cheek cells.
  • Volunteers lead groups of 10 students and a chaperone through the DNA extraction and conversation
  • Thursday, March 9, 2017 – “Genome Day”
    • Volunteer time commitment is 8:45am – 1pm, and involves the following:
      • Setting up work stations before students arrive
      • Walk students to the work stations from the Auditorium
      • Leading students through extracting DNA from their own cheek cells
      • Discussing genetics, DNA sequencing, working in science, careers, etc with the students to inspire them and break stereotypes they might have about what it means to be a scientist.  This is all covered in the training.
    • New volunteers, or those seeking a refresher must attend a one hour training session at the Center of Excellence (701 Ellicott Street, Buffalo NY)
      • Option 1 – Tuesday, February 21 at 3pm
      • Option 2 – Wednesday, February 22, 9am
      • Option 3 – Wednesday, March 1, 3pm
      • If these options do not work for you, but you are still interested in volunteering, contact me and we will work something out!
    • Breakfast (and coffee!) and a pizza lunch will be available for volunteers.

Please respond to Sandra Small by Wednesday, January 11th, if you are interested in volunteering!  Spread the word to anyone else that you think may be interested!

Sandra Small, Ph.D.

Science Education Manager

Genome, Environment and Microbiome Community of Excellence

New York State Center of Excellence

Bioinformatics & Life Sciences

 701 Ellicott Street

Buffalo, NY 14203

716.888.4851

sksmall@buffalo.edu

 

Why Diversity Matters in Health Care

As a health professions student, you need to be aware of the complex issues that shape the health care field in the United States. Some of the most urgent topics today revolve around our nation’s need to eliminate inequities in the quality and availability of health care for ethnic, racial and economic minorities. Closely connected to this is the need to increase both the diversity and the cultural competence of our health care workforce.

Please click to read more…

 

BRUSH Summer Research Program at Michigan State University

The Biomedical Research for University Students in Health Sciences (BRUSH) program at Michigan State University is a Summer Research Program for students from populations underrepresented in biomedical research. The BRUSH Program is suitable for students interested in biomedical research, and it is also valuable for students interested in human medicine or veterinary medicine.

 

During the 12-week BRUSH Program students conduct research under the guidance of a faculty mentor and also participate in ancillary activities to help them explore research as a career and succeed in the conduct and presentation of their research. The program is best suited for students who have completed their sophomore or junior year of undergraduate studies, although applicants with less college credit will be considered.

 

Students in this program are paid $4,800 for the summer, and additional funds are available to cover the cost of program related expenses (housing and conference travel).

For BRUSH Program details see  https://cvm.msu.edu/research/student-research/undergraduate-student-summer-research-program

Contact summerresearch@cvm.msu.edu

 

Seven Ways to Spend Your Winter Break (from AAMC)

Seven Ways to Spend Your Winter Break

The end of the semester is just around the corner, and you’re only a few weeks away from some very well-deserved time off. Not sure what to do over your winter break? We’ve got seven suggestions.
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You’re in the home stretch! With the end of the semester just around the corner, you’re a few weeks away from enjoying some well-deserved time off. If you’re still wondering what you will do during your break, here are seven things to consider:

1. Make summer plans. Gaining valuable experiences and exposure to the field of medicine is important for showing admissions committees why this is the right career for you. It’s not too early to start researching and applying for summer positions or programs. One option is the Summer Health Professions Education Program (SHPEP), a free, six-week academic enrichment program held at 13 program sites across the country. The application for summer 2017 is open until March 1. You can search for more opportunities here.

2. Read for fun. You probably read a lot for your classes all semester, so break is a great time to read something just for you. And it doesn’t have to be related to medicine. But if you’re looking for book recommendations for aspiring physicians, check out our list. Look up other recommendations and share what you’re reading on social media with #premedreads.

3. Learn about the application process. If you’re applying to medical school in 2017, now is a good time to start thinking about your application timeline, personal statement, and letters of evaluation. You’ll also want to familiarize yourself with the American Medical College Application Service® (AMCAS®) for information, resources, and tutorials specific to the application process. For a more comprehensive overview, we recommend The Official Guide to Medical School Admissions.

4. Reflect on why you’re pursuing medicine. One question that will be essential to answer when writing your personal statement and interviewing at medical schools is “why medicine?” It’s important to have an answer that’s specific and personal. If your answer is something general that could apply to many pre-meds (“I like to help people” or “I like science”), look closer at your experiences and the deeper reasons that keep you motivated to pursue this path. This will help differentiate you from the thousands of other applicants when it comes time to apply.

5. Make a MCAT study plan. If you’re taking your MCAT exam in January 2017, you’re probably already planning to study over your break. Even if you’re taking the exam later in the year, you can start making a study plan now. Here are some tips to get you started with developing your own plan based on your study habits, schedule, and learning style.

6. Volunteer. There are lots of opportunities to get involved in your community, especially around the holidays, such as volunteering at a food bank or sorting toy donations. Remember, you don’t just have to look for medically related opportunities for it to be to be valuable and meaningful experience. Here are some tips for finding volunteer experiences.

7. Relax and recharge. Feel like you need a break? Taking a step back and not doing anything pre-med related is okay, too. Sleep in, spend time with family and friends, catch up on a TV show, or whatever else is going to help you start the New Year and new semester strong and motivated. Learning how to find balance is an essential skill that will help you be successful now, in medical school, and as a future doctor.

No matter what you choose to do during your winter break, the AAMC wishes you happy holidays and a safe and healthy New Year!

 

Ohio State SUCCESS Summer Research Program

The Ohio State University College of Medicine

SUCCESS Summer Undergraduate Course

Creating Excellence in Scientific Study

May 22, 2017 – July 29, 2017

10 Weeks

PROGRAM HIGHLIGHTS

  • Laboratory Research
  • Professional Development/Ethics Training
  • Includes Housing, Travel Allowance and a generous stipend!

PROGRAM GOALS

  • Increase Diversity in BioMedical Sciences
  • Prepare students to be more competitive in MD/PhD programs

ELIGIBILITY

  • Expected College Graduation date in 2018 or 2019
  • Enrolled in a U.S. 4-year

APPLICATIONS

  • Available online October 2016
  • Application deadline January 7, 2017

CONTACT US

Stony Brook Online Pre-Shadowing Course

Winter session and spring semester (2017!) are approaching!  Registration for both begins on 10/31. For students coming from outside of Stony Brook (quite common) to enroll, you must first apply for an ID # followed about a week later by actual course registration.  First go online at http://www.stonybrook.edu/, click the “Admissions” tab near the top of the screen and then follow the instructions that appear.

As we’re sure you’re aware, physician shadowing is an extremely important (some might even argue, required) component of successful application to medical school.  Indeed it is a significant asset for student entrance into any of the health care professions (e.gs., nursing, pharmacy, dentistry and physician’s assistant training).  We at Stony Brook medical school have developed a program/course uniting pre- or nonclinical education (largely restricted to undergraduate campuses as well as nonclinical graduate programs) with that of the health care professional. To date, our initial course has already been offered several times. The course faculty teach extensively in undergraduate offerings on our University campus and graduate programs at both the Master’s and Doctoral levels. As evidence of our long experience in this area and in the high quality of our teaching, our Molecular and Cellular Pharmacology PhD Program (nonclinical) has been supported continuously by the NIH for more than 38 years. Our interprofessional course faculty are also extremely active in teaching in the Stony Brook Schools of Medicine, Dentistry, Nursing and Health Technology & Management.

For undergraduates, our online course, BCP 405, provides an opportunity to earn advanced credits, as well as prepare for immediate and in our experience, highly productive clinical exposure (e. g., physician shadowing). They also receive outstanding preparation for careers in multiple health-care-related disciplines, either at Stony Brook or elsewhere. Finally there are also opportunities for nonclinical graduate students (both PhD level and Master’s).

For further information, consult the Stony Brook undergraduate course catalog (http://sb.cc.stonybrook.edu/bulletin/current/courses/bcp/ [see BCP 405]).  Please do not hesitate to call or email Ms. J. Kito, our course administrator, if you have specific questions.